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Audio-Visual resources 3: Video/Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

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Audio-visual resources 3 Video The introduction of video in the classroom in the 1980s provided new and exciting possibilities for foreign languages teaching and learning. This is not a surprise as the same thing happened with audio cassettes and today’s CD-ROMs or multimedia. By bringing the real world into the foreign language classroom, moving images together with sounds not only enlivened it but also contextualised meaning. Apart from the list of advantages of audio-visual resources presented above, further advantages of using video in the classroom could be summarised as follows: Video widens the repertoire and range of listening activities. Video strengthens audio-visual linguistic perceptions simultaneously. Video offers a visual reinforcement of the target language. Video allows us to teach the paralinguistic features of the target language. Video lowers anxiety when practising the skill of listening. Video increases awareness of the L2 culture As mentioned above, video (and audio) materials are mainly used to improve listening comprehension. If this is so, they should be shown in segments and not as a whole. As Canning-Wilson (2000), states these segments should be broken down to exploit the macro-listening skills and the micro-listening skills from the audio-component of the video. There is no empirical evidence which indicates that videos shown in their entirety improve listening comprehension because the constant visual stimuli may detract from the auditory component. Balatova (1994) has shown that attention spans are lowered when watching videos used to teach foreign languages: "the first signs of distraction in those groups appeared after the first minute, and by the end of four minutes, distraction spread all over the groups, while in the video conditions several more students became distracted after six minutes, more students lost concentration after ten minutes and around one third of them kept watching until the end". The appropriate selection of video materials and the proper use of specific video activities are needed if teachers want to motivate students and make most of this powerful educational aid. CRITERIA FOR SELECTING VIDEOS FOR THE EFL CLASSROOMS watchability, completeness, length, and appropriateness of content. Video materials should be of interest for the students, should tell a complete story or section of a story, should take in length between 30 seconds and 10 minutes, should be appropriate for the age and maturity of the students. When presenting language or doing listening comprehension tasks, as a teacher you should also keep in mind the following factors: The degree of visual support. The density of language. The speech delivery. The content and level of language. VIDEO TECHNIQUES (Harmer 1991) SILENT VIEWING: The teacher plays the video with the sound turned off, the students speculate about what the characters are saying. FREEZE FRAME: The teacher might create expectations by freezing a frame on the screen, the students can predict what the characters will say. SOUND ONLY: The teacher turns the contrast down, the students listen to the sound only and try to guess where the conversation is taking place and who the speakers are. JIGSAW VIEWING: Half the class sit with their backs to the screen while the other half tells them what is happening while the video is being shown. Students’ video production can also bring motivation and enjoyment into the EFL classroom. Video making in the classroom takes dedication, inspiration, and plenty of extra time, not to mention the additional management and equipment responsibilities it tacks on teacher’s day-to-day duties but it is worth trying it and letting the students explore their creative use of filming. Nowadays, most mobile telephones have a camera for video recording. Students can also take advantage of this technology to video tape their own short passages in English (role play, reading aloud, singing, etc.) to show to their mates and increase confidence and motivation.

Video Details

Duration: 5 minutes and 27 seconds
Country: Spain
Language: English
Producer: Manuel Pérez Gutiérrez
Director: Manuel Pérez Gutiérrez
Views: 192
Posted by: mapegu on Dec 18, 2008

The introduction of video in the classroom in the 1980s provided new and exciting possibilities for foreign languages teaching and learning. This is not a surprise as the same thing happened with audio cassettes and today’s CD-ROMs or multimedia. By bringing the real world into the foreign language classroom, moving images together with sounds not only enlivened it but also contextualised meaning.

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