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SpaceVidcast Daily 20.08.09

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Here's a little Space News from around the world. South Korea's window for their latest attempt on their very first rocket launch closed as they scrubbed just 8 minutes before liftoff. The reason is stated as being an unspecified technical fault. As soon as the count stopped, mission controllers started their fuel dump. Since 2002 this is the seventh time Korea has tried to get the KLV1 off the ground. Because of their partnership with Russia, who also manufactured the first stage of the rocket, a new date will be set after a consultation between the two countries. A successful launch will put South Korea in the elite category of countries who have put a satellite into orbit using their own rocket at number 10. Pakistan is also trying to get a satellite into space around April of 2011 to monitor mineral and agricultural programs as well as general weather conditions. The project is fully funded by a Pakistani planning commission, who have said "There is no shortage of funds for space projects like this one." I think SpaceVidcast should move there. Germany is currently debating whether or not to try and secure expertise in the Aerospace sector by launching an unmanned moon mission. Peter Hintze, who is the state secretary for economy and technology, has said, "A German moon landing is possible during the course of the next decade, around 2015." And even though the costs for a mission like that are looking to be at least two billion dollars, Hintze is using some very familiar arguments for it, such as robotics and scientific expertise and an influx of high-tech jobs. In order to achieve such a lofty goal, he's made a simple 3 step plan. 1. Get a German made satellite into space. 2. Develop an automated landing system for a spacecraft. and 3. Develop a robotic rover in order to research the surface of the Moon. Now, I'm no rocket scientist, but I think he skipped a step in there somewhere. Keep in mind that Germany as a country has never planned its own mission to the moon. Although they have been involved in multiple European space programs. And earlier this week marked the 2000th sol for the Mars Spirit rover. Considering the original mission was for only 90 sol, I'd say that's not half bad. Opportunity, known to some as Spirit's twin, will reach its 2000th sol mark on September 8th of this year. And in case you're wondering, sol is the word for the Martian day, which lasts about 40 minutes longer than an Earth day, which would make me about 17 years old. Maybe I'll just move to Mars. http://www.spacevidcast.com

Video Details

Duration: 2 minutes and 42 seconds
Country: United States
Language: English
Producer: Benjamin Higginbotham
Director: Benjamin Higginbotham
Views: 88
Posted by: spacevidcaster on Aug 20, 2009

South Korea's window for their latest attempt on their first rocket launch closed as they scrubbed just 8 minutes before lift off. Pakistan is also trying to get a satellite into space around April of 2011 Germany is currently debating whether or not to try and secure expertise in the aerospace sector by launching an unmanned moon mission. And earlier this week marked the 2,000th SOL for the Mars Spirit rover.

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