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Writing Numbers in Words

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In this video, I am going to explain how to write a number in words. So, for example, if we are given the number 2,613 we want to be able to write down this number in the words you see below. And that means, I want to write it as Two thousand, (with a comma) six hundred thirteen But, before we can do this, before we can just take these digits and write them down in the word form I'm going to go over some basic concepts that is going to make the process easier for us. First of all, we need to know that commas separate each group of 3 numbers, starting on the right. So, if I take a string of numbers, and I'm just going to make these up, I need to insert commas so that the number is (what we call) in standard form. So I'm going to start on the right-hand side, and I'm just going to count off three numbers and then insert a comma. So, one, two, three...comma... one, two, three...comma... one, two, three... and because there's no number in front, I don't need to put another comma in the very front. If there was another number here, I would have. So, numbers that are written in this way with the commas separating every three digits are said to be in standard form. and each group of three numbers has a name called a period. If I look back up at this number I wrote down and I start on the right side and take a look at this grouping of three digits these numbers are said to be in the "ones" period. The next grouping of three numbers the 4, the 2, and the 1 (in this case) are said to be in the "thousands" period. and the 387, the next grouping of three, are said to be in the "millions" period. and if this number was larger, there would be something called the "billions" period and so on and so forth. But these period names become very important when you want to take the number for example, this 387 (million), 421 (thousand), 069 becomes very important when we want to write this number down in words. So the name of each period come from our knowledge of place value so I'm going to talk about that just a little bit. Okay, if you go back to your place value chart, and you are thinking about any number at all and I'm just going to insert some number here and I'll insert my commas where I need to one, two, three digits, and then a comma, one, two, three digits, and then a comma, and so on and so forth. Now every single digit within this number has a location name called a place value. So the 2 is in the "ones" position The 0 is in the "tens" The 6 is in the "hundreds" 5 is in the "thousands" 6 is in the "ten thousands" 4 is in the "hundred thousands" and so on... but the period names the grouping names for every group of three digits actually has a name that's related to its location in its place value chart. So, for example, this first grouping is called my "ones period." because it's the place value name of the digit in the far right within that grouping. The next set of three digits The 465 I know this is in the "thousands" position because if I take a look at just those three digits the 5 is in the "thousands" position and then the 38 is actually in the "millions period" because if I take a look at that next grouping the name of the place value on the right side is "millions." So, once again, if I just write down the period name, this is the "millions period" this is the "thousands period" and then we have the "ones period" Let's take a look at a couple of examples. Taking a number that's currently in digits and writing it down in words So I have this number here: 13,214 and to write this number in words, I want to start at the left. I'm going to take a look at this side of the number and I'm going to write or say the digit names that are in the very first period I come to So take a look here. The comma separates the periods. So I know that the 13 is the name of the number that's in this first period. So I'm just going to write down "thirteen" Now I need to write down the name of the period they were in. So, 13 was in the "thousands period" so I'm going to write down "thousand" What's a little tricky is that I actually do not put the "s" on here I'm just going to put "thousand" and then I want to insert a comma after the period name. and then I'm going to repeat the process with the next group. So if I take a look at the next grouping of numbers, I have 214. So I'm just going to write that down as "two hundred fourteen" Now, typically, I would put the period name at the end but the last period name of "ones" is left off the answer. And that's just what we do as a group. So, "Thirteen thousand, two hundred fourteen" is how we write this number 13,214 in words. Let's try another one. The first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to write down the period name of each one of these groupings of three digits So this is my "ones" period. This is my "thousands" period. And this is my "millions" period. So, starting on the left-hand side, I'm going to go ahead and say out loud The 5-2-3 that is actually read aloud as "five hundred twenty-three" So, let me write that down. "five hundred twenty-three" Now, when I come to a comma, I have to I have to write down the name of the period this number was in. Well, 523 was in the "millions" period, So, I'm going to write down "million" and then put the comma. So the period name and the comma go together. Now take a look at the next grouping. I have 216. so I'm going to write that down just like I said it. two hundred sixteen and because I come across a comma I need to write down the period name. Two hundred sixteen was in the "thousands" period so I'm going to write down "thousand" (no "s") and put the comma next to it and then I need to take a look at the next three digits I would read that as "seven hundred twenty-five" and because it's in the "ones" period I'm not going to write down the word "ones" It's understood to be left off. One point I want to make is that I never wrote down the word "and" I didn't do that. So, it's five hundred twenty-three million, (comma) two hundred sixteen thousand, (comma) seven hundred twenty-five. The word "and" (even though we might in everyday language) say the word "and" when we are reading this number, we don't write it down unless it's considered a decimal point. So, for example, If this was money and I had some change left over, I might say that I have "five hundred twenty-three million, two hundred sixteen thousand, seven hundred twenty-five dollars AND fifteen cents" If i wanted to put that extra change in there then I would put the word "and" We also want to be able to take a number that's currently in word form and change it to standard form version where it's just the digits that you are using to express the number. So, for example, If I have a number written in words as "fourteen thousand, three hundred sixty-four and I want to change it into digits which is standard form I'm going to follow these 5 steps. The first thing I'm going to do is start on the left and I'm going to write down the number that's in the first period or group. So if I look at "fourteen thousand, (comma) three hundred sixty-four" I remember that that thousand with the comma next to it is actually the name of the period that the fourteen is in. So, I'm going to start out by writing 14, (comma) so I do keep the comma and I have to make sure that 14 is in the "thousands" period. So I'm going to write dashes for the correct number of places for the correct number of places to make sure 14 is in the "thousands" period and that means I'm going to put three dashes after it and I need to fill in these three dashes with the remaining numbers. So, I'm going to fill in the remaining digits and the remaining digits are "three hundred sixty-four" So that's going to be 364 and in this case, I don't need any placeholder 0s because there are no missing digits So my answer is actually 14,364 Let's try a little bit trickier one. I want to write this number in standard form. Two million, thirty-five thousand, one hundred four So I start on the left-hand side and I have "two million" so because I see the word "million" with a comma next to it I know that's actually the period name. I'll have 2, (comma) and I need to make sure it's in the "millions" position so I'm going to put six dashes Remember, this is my ones period, this is my thousands period, and 2 is in the millions period. Now I need to put 35 in the "thousands" period. The word "thousand" is next to the comma, so that's the name of the period that the 35 has to be in. Now I have to be a little careful. I can't put the 35 here because later on, I'm going to have to put placeholder 0s in and that's going to look like 350 which is not what I was given. So instead of putting the 3 and the 5 at the beginning I'll put the 35 in the second two dashes and put a placeholder 0 Now I have 35 in the "thousands" period. And in the last period, I need to put "one hundred four" So, "one hundred four" would be 104. So, here's my answer It's going to be 2 million, 35 thousand including the zero where I need it to be 104 and that would be my answer.

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Duration: 11 minutes and 50 seconds
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Language: English
License: Dotsub - Standard License
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Views: 2
Posted by: brenna87 on Jan 25, 2016

Writing Numbers in Words

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