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Flute 18 (Rockin' Out The Blues)

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[ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] Enough of this classical stuff. It's time to learn Rockin' Out the Blues. The Blues is where all rock, pop, hip hop, R & B, Motown, all of this awesome modern music comes from. It's the roots of this music, and it's so fun to play. Just like all the other pieces we've learned, we're going to take Rockin' Out the Blues one step at a time and learn a couple of measures and then piece it all together at the end. Off the bat, let's start with measure nine. It's the hardest because there's concepts that we haven't heard of before. The grace note. Grace notes are really fast, quick notes before the main note that we play. The main note is much longer. The grace note leads to it. It's just a little tiny ornament. In this case, it's a grace note F to a G. We all remember the fingering for an F. Start here, first all three fingers in the left hand down, first, middle, ring, thumb, first finger in the right hand. Simply from an F to a G, we raise our first finger in the right hand, we have a G. So this should be really easy, really easy to make a really fast F to a G. So the main note is a G. The F note is fast. The F note should have the articulation, the ta-, the ta- syllable that we learned earlier. Let's try it. I'll play measure nine and ten once, and then we'll play it together, see how it goes. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] You notice how the F is really fast. It's articulated, but it's over before you know it. The G is the main note. Let's try it together. We have four quarter notes followed by two more quarter notes in the next measure and a half note to end that measure. I'll count to four. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] Adds a bit of soulfulness, doesn't it? That's pretty cool. OK. Let's learn measures one and two. Measure one, let's look at the notes. C, B flat, C, E flat, B flat, C. Let's count measures one and two together. Be mindful of the two eighth notes on the second beat of the first measure. I'll give you four counts, and we'll both come in on one. One, two, three, four. [clap, clap-clap-clap, clap, clap] Rest, rest, rest. One more time. One, two, three, four. [clap, clap-clap-clap, clap, clap] Rest, rest, rest. It's really important that you practice counting the rests because they're there for a reason. We can't just go barreling through into the next one. It's important. If you play with other people, they'll wonder what you're doing because you're not counting and you won't be with them when you come in again. So always be mindful of the rests. Let's play. We've gone over the fingerings; we know the rhythm. Now let's put it both together and play measures one and two. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] Again. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] Moving on. Measures three and four look oddly familiar. They're the same as measures one and two, so we don't have to worry about them. We'll just repeat measures one and two. Measure five and measure six. Let's look at the notes. F, F, E flat, F-F-F—same three— C in measure six. Let's count this rhythm once. One, two, three, four. [clap-clap-clap-clap-clap, clap, clap] One more time being mindful of all the eighth notes. One and two and three and four and— [clap-clap-clap-clap-clap, clap, clap] Awesome. Putting it all together. Let's play measures five and six. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] One more time. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] Awesome. OK. Measure seven and eight, again, same thing. This is a pattern in music. Music often repeats itself. It's a similar motive coming back over and over again. It's what makes music really recognizable. We know this song because we know those two measures really well. Measures nine and ten we have previously talked about. Measures eleven and twelve repeat again. There's a funny-looking thing in measure twelve though at the very end of the piece. It's called a fermata. With fermatas, we hold the note out longer than its real value. So this is a half note, and we want to really just hold it out, make it our own ending. Play at least a half note plus another beat, maybe more. Ad lib. OK. Let's play the entire thing now. I'll play it once for you, and then you can join me the next time. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] Something like that. Let's play it together being mindful that the rests in between each phrase happen for three beats. So it's a quarter rest and a half rest. So three beats total resting. Be sure to count your rests or else we won't come in together at the same time. I'll count four. One, two, three, four. [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] [ ♪ playing flute ♪ ] At the very end, if you're playing with a group or a conductor, that was a cutoff where I kind of waved my flute at the very end. So you can follow somebody, either a conductor doing this with a baton or another instrument cutting you off. It's just a visual cue to stop playing together. And that is Rockin' Out the Blues.

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Duration: 8 minutes and 30 seconds
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Language: English
License: Dotsub - Standard License
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Views: 50
Posted by: lifeboat on May 24, 2015

Flute 18 (Rockin' Out The Blues)

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