Watch videos with subtitles in your language, upload your videos, create your own subtitles! Click here to learn more on "how to Dotsub"

Our moon like you have never seen it before - SpacePod 2010.12.21

0 (0 Likes / 0 Dislikes)
Three new crew members reach the International Space Station and a really interesting way to look at our own moon. I'm Benjamin Higginbotham and this your Spacevidcast SpacePod for Dec. 21, 2010. On Wednesday, December 15, 2010 a Russian Soyuz rocket lifted off carrying the next three members bound for the International Space Station. [video] Five seconds Engines at maximum thrust and Lift off of the Soyuz TMA-20 as Cady Coleman, Paolo Nespoli and Dmitry Kondratyev head toward the International Space Station Ben: Then on Friday the 17th, the capsule docked with the space station at 20:11 UTC [video] Range rate nominal, and contact. Capture confirmed on display 44. Docking confirmed at 11:11pm Moscow time. 2:11pm CST over the Southwest corner of the Republic of Mali in Western Africa. Ben: A couple of hours later the expanded Expedition 26/27 crew opened the hatch and ingressed into the station. [video] The hatch is opened officially at 5:02pm CST. Dmitry Kondratyev arrives in the International Space Station in the Rassvet module. Cady Coleman next greeted by Aleksandr Kaleri. And Paolo Nespoli receiving greetings from Aleksandr Kaleri. The International Space Station back to a six person crew. All of the crew members now on board. The official hatch opening time 5:02pm CST, 2:02am Moscow time on Saturday Expedition 26 doubling in size. Ben: The three person crew of Soyuz TMA-20 Dmitry Kondratyev, Catherine Coleman and Paolo Nespoli represent partner organizations of Roscosmos, NASA, and the European Space Agency in the ISS program. While the US and Russia added more people to the space station, China launched a rocket to add more satellites to their upcoming GPS constellation this last Friday. A new satellite navigation and positioning network, or COMPASS system, was launched aboard a Long March 3A rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center at 20:20 UTC This is the second of what will be thiry-five satellites providing both civilian and military GPS data to China. Being that we just saw a lunar eclipse. How about a totally new way of looking at the Moon? NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO is orbiting the moon creating the most precise and complete map-to-date of the Moon's complex surface. Originally launched to help scout out landing sites for the nearly defunct Constellation program, LRO remains in lunar orbit gathering data. Using an instrument called the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter, or LOLA, the spacecraft sends a single laser pulse down to the lunar surface through an optical element that splits the pulse into five beams. These five beams then strike the surface of the Moon and depending how long it takes for each one to return, LOLA is able to map out what the surface terrain looks like. The end results are some psychedelic pictures of our Moon By artificially adding color, we can get a good idea as to what the surface looks like. The red ares indicate high elevation, whereas blue is low. You can get more pictures and video at NASA's LRO website. Ever wish you could get rocket and shuttle launch notifications sent right to your iPhone? Maybe a countdown to the next launch on your iPod Touch? Well now you can. Mission Clock is a $5.00 application available now in the iTunes Apple Store for iOS devices. This awesome, space-geek app allows you to see what upcoming missions are launching, when they'll actually launch and even get mission details. It's a great showpiece to help get your friends excited about spaceflight and for the next 24 hours, Spacevidcast is giving away ten copies to ten lucky winners. It's easy to enter. Simply send out a tweet with a link to this video, and #Spacevidcast and you're automatically entered. The contest starts Dec. 21, 2010 at midnight UTC and ends at 23:59 UTC the same day. So you have nearly 24 hours to enter and win. If you think that's a cool prize you should see what we're giving away during our live show this Friday at 0200 UTC. It's going to be awesome and I know we'll see you there.

Video Details

Duration: 5 minutes and 35 seconds
Country: United States
Language: English
Genre: None
Views: 89
Posted by: spacevidcast on Dec 21, 2010

3 new crew members reach the ISS and a really interesting way to look at our own moon. I'm Benjamin Higginbotham and this is your Spacevidcast SpacePod for December 21st, 2010.
On Wednesday, December 15th 2010 a Russian Soyuz rocket lifted off carrying the next 3 crew members bound for the International Space Station. Then on Friday the 17th the capsule docked with the space station at 20:11 UT. A couple of hours later The expanded Expedition 26/27 crew opened the hatch and ingressed to the station. The three person crew of Soyuz TMA-20, Dmitri Kon-drat-yev, Catherine Coleman and Paolo Nespoli represent the partner organizations of Roscosmos, NASA and the European Space Agency in the ISS program.
While the US and Russia added more people to the Space Station, China launched a rocket to add more satellites to their upcoming GPS constellation this last Friday. A new satellite navigation and positioning network or Compass System was launched aboard a Long March 3A rocket from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center at 20:20 UT. This is the 2nd of what will be 35 satellites providing both civilian and military GPS data to China.
Being that we just saw a lunar eclipse, how about a new way to look at the moon? NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter or LRO is orbiting the moon creating the most precise and complete map to date of the moons complex surface. Originally launched to help scout out landing sites for the nearly defunct Constellation program, LRO remains in Lunar Orbit gathering data. Using an instrument called the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter or LOLA the spacecraft sends a single laser pulse down to the lunar surface through an optical element that splits the pulse in to 5 beams. These 5 beams then strike the surface of the moon and depending on how long it takes for each to return, LOLA is able to map out what the surface terrain looks like. The end result are some psychedelic pictures of our moon. By artificially adding color in we can get a good idea as to what the surface of the moon looks like. The red areas indicate high elevation whereas the blue areas are the lowest. You can get more pictures and videos at NASA's LRO web site.
Ever wish you could get rocket and shuttle launch notifications sent to your iPhone? Maybe countdown to the next launch on your iPod Touch? Well now you can! MissionClock is a $5.00 application available now in the iTunes Apple store for iOS devices. This awesome space geek app allows you to see what upcoming missions are launching, when they will launch and even get mission details. It is a great showpiece to help get your friends excited about space flight and for the next 24 hours Spacevidcast is giving away 10 copies to 10 lucky winners! It's easy to enter! Simply send out a tweet with a link to this video and the hash tag #spacevidcast and you'll be automatically entered! The contest starts December 21st, 2010 at midnight UT and ends at 23:59 UT the same day. You have nearly 24 hours to enter to win! And if you think this is a cool prize, you should see what we're giving away during our live show this Friday at 0200 UT. It's going to be awesome and I know we'll see you there!

Caption and Translate

    Sign In/Register for Dotsub to translate this video.