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Train the Trainer

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[MARITIME TRAINING SERVICES INC.] [In case of any conflict between the requirements shown in the movie and the company's safety management system (SMS),] [please follow the company's SMS requirements] [TRAIN THE TRAINER] We've all seen bad trainers. Trainers that just read directly from a power point while students are sleeping in class, checking their watch, and thinking about their next meal. The problem with these instructors is, their students aren't learning the key safety points which inhibits their ability to prevent dangerous situations from occurring. By following some of these simple best practices, trainers can engage and communicate effectively, creating a better and safer work environment for everyone. After viewing this program, you will be able to: [List four questions to ask before planning your training course] list four questions to ask before planning your training course, [Create effective learning objectives] create effective learning objectives [Provide different types of assessments] and provide different types of assessments, [Explain considerations for teaching adult learners in the maritime industry] explain some considerations for teaching adult learners in the maritime industry, [List Do's and Don'ts for teaching and training course] and list some do's and don'ts for teaching a training course and being an effective mentor. [Chapter 01: PRESENTATION IS IMPORTANT] The way that you communicate your lesson can be as important as the subject matter itself. An effective trainer engages students by explaining how the content of the course applies to their jobs, presents learning goals at the beginning of the course, asks questions that allow learners to build on previous experience, and uses reflection for future purpose. We've all been there, when a teacher reads directly from the board and fails to engage with the students. Don't be that teacher, it's not interesting. [KEY TAKEAWAYS] Let's review some key takeaways. [The trainer provides a purpose at the beginning of the course] The trainer provides a purpose at the beginning of the course, [Informs the learners of the learning goals] informs the learners of the learning goals, [Uses a visual aid to support understanding of the content] uses a visual aid to support understanding of the content, [Interacts with the learners in a natural way] interacts with the learners in a natural way, [Asks questions, Allows for reflection that could be applied to future learning] asks questions and allows for reflection that could be applied to future learning. [Chapter 02: PLANNING YOUR COURSE] Before you develop your course, ask yourself the following questions: Who is the audience? What is their experience? Will some of my learners need more help than others? What are the learning objectives for my course? Be clear about learning objectives. Ask yourself, what do I want my students to be able to do or know when they are finished with this training? Make a list and then use Bloom's Taxonomy for words that will help you write effective learning objectives. [CREATE, EVALUATE, ANALYZE, APPLY, UNDERSTAND, REMEMBER] Bloom's Taxonomy is a resource that classifies educational learning objectives into levels of complexity. [KNOW, LEARN, DO] Verbs like know, learn, and do should be avoided because they can't be assessed. [EXPLAIN, LIST, ASSESS, CHOOSE, DEMONSTRATE] Verbs like explain, list, assess, choose, and demonstrate are examples of objectives that can be measured. For example, when learning CPR, it is helpful for students to list the proper steps of the procedure. There are different types of assessment. When we hear the word assessment, many of us think of tests or quizzes. Giving an exam is not the only way you can effectively assess your students. You might try observing your learners while they complete a task and then provide feedback. Asking them to critique someone else as he or she performs a task. Or, asking your students to present the steps for a certain procedure to the class, and then have the class provide feedback. These are all effective forms of assessment that allow students to apply what they are learning. [Chapter 03: CONSIDERATIONS FOR TEACHING SEAFARERS] One important consideration when teaching adults is that we like to know why we are being asked to learn something. Sometimes our minds can be like a filing cabinet that is already jam packed. When being asked to learn something new, there's often resistance. It's not because we're against learning, it's because we've only got so much precious space in our cabinet. That's why it's important to explain to your learners how this information will benefit them. Learners will be more motivated when they know there's a practical application. [KEEP IN MIND] So keep in mind, [The material that you present should be relevant to their jobs and their lives] the material that you present should be relevant to the learners jobs and their lives, [The presentation should engage all learners, and give them an opportunity to share their experiences] the presentation should engage all learners and give them an opportunity to share their experiences, [The training environment should feel safe and welcoming to all learners] and the training environment should feel safe and welcoming to all learners. Teaching seafarers presents other challenges. Where will the training take place? On shore or on-board? What implications does this have for teaching? What resources will you have or not have? Consider combining part of you lesson or discussion, with a drill or practical situation to get the class involved. For example, if you're discussing something about the engine room, leave the classroom and go visit the engine room to have a visual. What is the language of instruction? Are all learners proficient in that language? How can you support them if they aren't? Try to assess their English language skills and use visuals to help communicate if necessary. Are you aware of the cultures of all your learners? Including age, gender, religion, and educational experiences. Some learners will say that they understand when in actuality, they don't. Make them demonstrate that they've understood what has been communicated. Different cultures respond to authority differently, so use caution as the instructor. Always remember you are teaching adults. Speaking to them in a tone as though they are children is offensive. Damaging that relationship with your students is hard to overcome. Speaking with words of encouragement and showing respect works wonders. [Chapter 04: DO'S AND DON'TS] Here are some simple do's and don'ts to remember. Do, introduce yourself to your class. Show respect for all class members. Elicit participation from different members of the group. Watch and listen to your students. Be flexible and ready to improvise. You can expect that at least one of your plans will go awry. Whether that means your computer won't start up, the projector is malfunctioning, or there's another unexpected event. Use stories, examples, cases, and anecdotes to help learners help connect the material and see how it can be applied to their job. Don't: Rush through your content, especially if the language you're using isn't your students native language. Lecture the entire course. Lecturing is sometimes required but research shows that active learning, as opposed to passive learning, which is what happens during lectures, is much more effective for retaining content. Don't interrupt your students when they're sharing. Or, take yourself too seriously. Not all training takes place in a classroom. It's important to be a good mentor outside of the classroom. Here are some tips for being an effective mentor. Foster a relationship. Get to know your mentee personally. Share your experiences. Including mistakes and challenges you've faced. Your mentee can anticipate certain challenges and learn from how you handled them. Offer helpful feedback. Not all feedback is helpful. Ask for permission before giving feedback and frame it in a way that will be well received. Acknowledge achievements. Everyone needs a pat on the back every now and then. Make sure to give praise when your mentee is making progress. Especially if it's something that they may not recognize on their own. In this video, you learned, [Four questions to ask yourself before planning your training course] four questions to ask yourself before you begin planning your training course, [Examples of effective and ineffective learning objectives] examples of effective and ineffective learning objectives, [Examples of different types of assessment] examples of different types of assessment, [Some considerations for teaching adult learners in the maritime industry] some considerations for teaching adult learners and learners in the maritime industry, [Do's and Don'ts when teaching a training course] do's and don'ts when teaching a training course, [Tips for being an effective mentor] and, tips for being an effective mentor. Now you understand the best practices for you to engage and communicate effectively with your students. Be the trainer who is inspiring. If you do this, your students will leave feeling confident in their ability to create a safer work environment for everyone.

Video Details

Duration: 8 minutes and 39 seconds
Country: Andorra
Language: English
License: Dotsub - Standard License
Genre: None
Views: 7
Posted by: maritimetraining on Oct 6, 2017

Train the Trainer

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